The Sydney Recording Studio Baritone is a member of the brass family. As with all brass instruments, the sound is produced by buzzing the lips into a mouthpiece. The baritone works in the same manner as a trumpet but it’s twice the length. It plays the exact same notes as a trombone and even uses the same mouthpiece. The biggest difference is that the baritone uses valves rather than a slide to change the length of the air flow. The baritone is relatively easy to learn for beginners. The deep beautiful tone from a baritone is attractive to many students who like the sound of a lower voice. Many students who like the tuba start out on the baritone with plans to switch to the tuba after a year or two of band. The tuba is the same as a baritone in nearly every way. It’s just twice the length. At our Sydney Recording Studio we can record all brass instruments to perfection.

Sydney Recording Studio: Baritone Care

Taking care of a baritone is easier than a woodwind instrument and very similar to a trumpet or tuba. It is stored in the case in just two pieces. The only regular maintenance required is to oil the valves now and then and grease the slides as needed.

Sydney Recording Studio: How a Baritone is played

The baritone is played with the right hand on the valves. The left arm usually supports the bottom of the instrument. There are a number of shapes and sizes of baritones. Some have vertically angled valves with the mouthpiece attaching on the left side of the instrument. Others have diagonally angled valves with the mouthpiece attached on the right side of the instrument. The bell on baritones can be either straight up or bent forward. None of these differences really matter for younger players. Good brands of instruments are made with all of these configurations.

Sydney Recording Studio Brass Family